Mayhem  7's  is  the brain-child of Coach Ry Akana.   Coach   Ry   is   the  President  and owner  of  Akana Athletics, LLC   and QBFG Academy.    He   has   been   a  high  school football  coach  for  30  years, and spent the last  5  years  as the head coach & offensive coordinator  at  Sammamish  high school  in Bellevue, WA.

The  concept of Mayhem 7's was developed over  the  many  years  that Coach Ry spent coaching  high  school football, and the time he  spent  training  young  quarterbacks.  He was   frustrated   with   the   lack  of  realistic quarterback work his quarterbacks received, particularly   in   the  off-season,  when  high school  teams  can  really  only participate in organized  7  on  7  passing leagues.  When they  returned  for  fall camp, he noticed that his  quarterbacks  had developed bad habits in their footwork and pocket awareness over the  summer  and  had to spend valuable fall

camp  time  working  to reset  their  feet  and  correcting  their  pocket  limitations.  He  frowns upon the 7 on 7 format, as it pertains to the quarterback position, and cites that the traditional format  of  7 on 7 is not very conducive or realistic for the quarterback.  Very rarely ever, does the  quarterback  have the luxury of sitting comfortably in the pocket for four seconds, making uncontested  throws  with  no pressure or any sensation of chaos around him!  He feels that it did  more  damage  to his quarterbacks, because it gave them a false sense of security in the pocket.

Coach Ry started to add simulations of pressures in his pass offense/pass defense periods in practice, in  order  to  give  his  quarterbacks  more  quality  work in the pocket, making better decisions  with  the  football, and developing escape methods from different angle pressures.  What evolved from these drills, is the basis of the "Mayhem 7's" format.  

Simply  put,  Mayhem  7's is  the  traditional 7 on 7 format, with a live rush on the quarterback on  every  play.  Pressures come from designated rushers on the line of scrimmage.  The drill is  designed  to  accelerate  the  QB  I.Q,  help the QB make better and quicker decisions  on  where  to  throw  the  ball,  develop  his  escape  tools  out  of  the  pocket  (Yes,  Mayhem 7's does  allow  for  the  QB  to  break the pocket and extend the play before the expiration of the 4 second timer).  The only rule on the Mayhem 7's extended play, is that the QB can only run  toward  the  sideline, in the direction that he broke out of the pocket.  He is then attempting to complete a pass on the run. 

"Statistics have proven that the success rate for scoring touchdowns and converting first downs, increase exponentially, if your quarterback can extend plays outside the pocket." - Bill Polian, NFL analyst for ESPN

As  the  Mayhem  7's  format  now  gives the quarterback the ability to extend the four second play,  receivers  now need to be adept  in  their  routes.  "Scramble" rules  are  now  in  effect; coming  back  to  the  quarterback if you were going vertical, going left if you were going right, going  vertical  if you were coming back or sitting, or finding open spaces on the field to sit in.

Defensively,  the  defense  now  has  to  more  proficient  at  covering  receivers on extended  plays.  They  need  to  be  able  to  be more explosive on 'start-and-stop' movements laterally and vertically, to recovering from the receivers scramble rule.  Comprehensively, Mayhem 7's is  a  format  that  gives  everyone  involved  on  the playing field, offensively and defensively,  better quality work and a more realistic look at game like situations. 



FIELD SET UP & POSITIONING
Below,   is   how   the  field  is  set  up  for  a  Mayhem  7's  game.  Each  game  has  (1)  one official  timer, and  (2)  two  referees.  One referee is positioned on the line of scrimmage, and the  other is positioned in the defensive secondary.  The official timer is positioned behind the offense.  The  offensive  coach  also  stands  behind  the  offense  to  select  the  "Rusher"  of choice, on each down.

The Mayhem 7's format is set up with (4) four defensive rushers (See Fig. 1):

• #2 & #3 - Aligned in "1" or "3" techniques. They are the dual A & B gap rushers

• #1 & #4 - Aligned in "5" or "9" techniques. They are the dual C & D gap rushers

Rushers are trained by the Mayhem 7's staff to execute their roles.    In our effort to make this as  realistic  as  possible,  rushers  need  to  have  their  rush timing right, their path to the QB correct (See Fig. 2),  and  what  they  do  to  the  QB  when  they  are  assigned  as  the "live" rusher.  Each rusher  is  equipped  with  a pool noodle and a hand shield, which act as aids in their roles on each play or down.







Rushers  belong to the Mayhem 7's team and are trained to simulate an accurate rush on the quarterback.  The  path  to  the  quarterback  is  crucial  to helping quarterbacks tie their eyes from  the rushers through to the defenders and receivers.  The defensive lineman never have a  straight-line  to  the  quarterback.  The  protection  from  the  offensive  lineman pushes the rushers  out,  to  create  a safe pocket for the quarterback.  So, it is important that our rushers take the same arc line to the quarterback.






POOL NOODLE
As  crazy  as  it  may  sound,  the  pool noodle is used in  the  Mayhem 7's  format  to provide a  type  of  physical  distraction  to  the  QB.  It  helps him develop his pocket sensory skills.  
 
When a rusher has the assignment to rush the quarterback,  he  uses the noodle to gently tap the  QB,  around  the vicinity of his upper torso (shoulders, arms, back)  before he throws  the  ball.  We try to simulate for the QB, as best we can, an  array  of  hand  grabs  and  arm swats that  he'll feel around him, sitting in the pocket. If  the QB decides to break the pocket, the live rusher  chases  him toward the sideline, while  continuing  to  strike him with the noodle.  This
gives  the  quarterback  an  added  element of urgency while being pursued, and having to be accurate  while  throwing  on  the  run.  It's  really  not  as easy as it sounds!  Each  rusher  is  armed  with  a  hand  shield  pad,  and  a  pool  noodle.  They  are  effective  tools in  creating a  simulated  sensation  of chaos and duress, which greatly enhances and develops the QB's pocket sensory and awareness skills.  Get comfortable being uncomfortable! 

HAND SHIELD PAD
When  you  hear  football commentators during a game say, "Wow, he really took a shot after that  throw!"  They  are  referring  to  the  quarterback  getting  hit by a blitzing linebacker.  We teach  our  quarterbacks  to  stand  in  the  pocket,  until  receivers  can get separation from a defender,  to  deliver  a  pass.  What  we  don't  prepare our quarterbacks for, is the inevitable shot  they  will take from that blitzing linebacker!   Mayhem 7's tries to re-create that hit on the quarterback,  by  arming  the  designated  rushers  with  a  hand  shield  pad.  The live rusher uses the hand shield pad to deliver a shot on the quarterback upon making his throw.



THE GAME STRUCTURE
To  be  absolutely  certain  that  you  are getting the maximum benefit from participating in the Mayhem  7's  format,  it's  imperative that the quarterback coach, the offensive coordinator, or the passing game coordinator proficiently trains their quarterback in these three areas: 

1. Where he goes with the football based on;
       • A gap pressure by rushers #2 or #3 (in 1 tech alignment) or,
       • A gap immediate blitz by a linebacker (Proxy blitzers #2 or #3)
       • B gap pressure from the rushers #2 or #3 (in 3 tech alignment)  
       • C gap pressure from rushers #1 or #4 (in 5 tech alignment) or,
       • D gap Immediate blitz by a defensive back (Proxy blitzers #1 or #4 in a 9 tech align.)

2. Able to utilize evasion techniques from all pressures, and throw from within the pocket

3. Know how to bail and escape the pocket from B, C & D gap pressures when receivers are  covered, and be able to throw on the run while moving toward the sideline.

A  quarterback  will  NOT  have  time  to  think  about  how  he  will handle different pressures once the play begins.  He needs to be thinking about his progressions, reading defenses, and getting  the  ball  out  of  his  hands  in  4 seconds.  Reaction to pressures need to be handled intuitively  as  second  nature  instinct.  To  accomplish that, he needs to be equipped with the knowledge  and  skill  set  of  how to escape the pocket from each of these pressures, and be able  to  throw  on  the  run.  These skills needs to be practiced and heavily repped in order to be successful in this format.  
 
As  in  the traditional 7 on 7 game, the ball starts on the 40 yd. line going in.  After the offense breaks  the  huddle,  the  offensive coach or coordinator points to (1) one rusher to be the live rusher. On the snap of  the  ball,  all 3 rushers (with the exception of rushers #2 or #3 on an A gap  blitz, or rushers #1 or #4 on a D gap blitz) must  delay  for  a  two  second  count.   After  the   two   second   count,   ALL   rushers  take  two  hard  steps  up  field, and  only  the  'live' rusher  continues  his  path  to  the quarterback.  As he approaches the QB, he begins to frap him  with  the  pool  noodle,  then  delivers a shot with the hand shield to the QB as he makes his  throw.  The   other  3 rushers  drop  their  noodles and hand shields, raise their arms over their heads to interfere with the throwing lanes of the QB.

On  the  A gap  blitz,  the  Mike  or  Will  linebackers have the option to show or not show pre-snap  blitz.  On the snap, either M or W will  take  a  knee  at  rusher  #2 or 3's  spot  (1 tech)  and  is  NOT  involved  in  the  rest  of  the  play.  Proxy  rusher  #2  becomes  the  immediate rusher to the QB.

Below  is  an  example  of  an  A  gap  immediate blitz for the Mike backer, executed by proxy rusher #2.


*Proxy rusher #2 does NOT delay 2 seconds on the A gap blitz, he comes immediately on the snap!

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  1,  2 & 4 move the hose to the new L.O.S.  Rusher #3  is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.  Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows  his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.

Below is an example of an A gap rush, by rusher #2 (in a 1 tech alignment)

Rusher #2 does delay 2 seconds on the A gap rush, no linebacker blitz

After the two second  count,  ALL  rushers take two hard steps upfield.  Rusher #2, the 0 tech 'live'  rusher  continues  his  path  to  the  quarterback,  striking  the  QB  with  the noodle and  delivering a shot with the hand shield as QB makes his throw. The  other  3 rushers drop their noodles  and  hand shields, raise  their  arms  over  their  heads  to interfere with the throwing lanes of the QB.

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  1,  2 & 4 move the hose to the new L.O.S.  Rusher #3  is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.  Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows  his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.

Below is an example of the B gap rush call by the rusher #3 (3 tech).


Rusher #3 is the 'live' B gap rusher.  He simulates his path to the QB, as if being blocked by the right guard.  It is NOT a direct line to the QB.

After the two second  count,  ALL  rushers take two hard steps upfield.  Rusher #3, the 3 tech 'live'  rusher  continues  his  path  to  the  quarterback,  striking  the  QB  with  the noodle and  delivering a shot with the hand shield as QB makes his throw. The  other  3 rushers drop their noodles  and  hand  shields, raise  their  arms  over their heads  to  interfere with the throwing lanes of the QB.

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  1,  2 & 4 move the hose to the new L.O.S.  Rusher #3  is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.  Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows  his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.

Below is an example of a C gap rush call by rusher #4 (5 tech).


Rusher #4 is the 'live' 5 tech rusher.  #4 simulates his path to the QB, as if being blocked by the left tackle.




Rusher #4 is the 'live'  9 tech rusher. #4 simulates an immediate safety blitz.


After  the  two  second  count,  ALL  rushers take two hard steps upfield.  Only rusher #4, the 5 tech 'live' rusher continues  his path to the quarterback, striking the QB with the noodle and  delivering a shot with the hand shield as QB makes his throw. The  other  3 rushers drop their noodles  and  hand shields, raise  their  arms  over  their  heads to interfere with  the throwing lanes of the QB.

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  1,  2 & 4 move the hose to the new L.O.S.  Rusher #3  is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.  Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows  his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down




WHAT THE QUARTERBACK NEEDS TO KNOW TO BE SUCCESSFUL

There  are  two  facets  pertaining  to  the Mayhem 7's format, that a QB needs to really know and  understand  to  be  successful.   One,  is  being able to successfully get a throw off from  within  the  pocket,  while  evading  and  being  harassed  by the live rusher from the A, B, C,  or  D  gaps.   Second, is  the  QB's  option  to escape the pocket and  extend the play beyond the  4  second  timer, making  a  throw  on  the  run, while moving toward the sideline. This, in essence, is what makes Mayhem 7's uniquely different from the traditional 7 on 7.

1. EVADE & THROW FROM WITHIN THE POCKET

Successful  quarterbacks  are  one's  that demonstrate patience in the pocket, run through all their  progressions,  and  deliver  strikes  amidst  the  chaos  around them. Mayhem 7's is the perfect  way  to condition and train a quarterback to accomplish those tasks.  Anybody can be perfect under zero pressure and no distractions! 

Let's begin with how we teach QB's to evade the A gap immediate blitzer, and the best option to throw to.


The QB steps away from the A gap blitzer, and throws away from pressure

In  handling  the  A  gap immediate  rush  (linebacker blitz);  your  QB  should  have  answers, pre-snap, for the following;  

           1. Who is hot?
           2. 1-on-1 matchup of his best outside receiver

At  pre-snap, if  the  QB  detects  an  immediate  rush  by  the  Mike  or  Will  linebackers,  he  will  communicate  to  his  receivers opposite  the  blitz,  that he will  throw  HOT to their side.  On the snap, QB drops, steps away from pressure and throws to a hot receiver in the shaded area.

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  #1 & #4  move the hose to the new L.O.S.  Rusher #3  is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.  Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows  his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.


The QB steps away from the 1 tech rusher, and throws away from pressure

This  throw  is  not  as  immediate  as  the unblocked LB blitz, but the QB still needs to get the ball out quickly.  He needs to know where the quick routes, opposite A gap pressure, are.  On the  snap,  QB  drops, steps  away  from  pressure and throws to a hot receiver in the shaded area.

If  the  result  of the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S  spot.   Rushers   #1   &   #4   rushers   move   the   hose   to   the   new   spot.   Rusher  #3  is responsible  to  move  and  set  the QB  tee.  Once it is set, the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.


The QB dips his back shoulder through the reaching paws of the 3 tech rusher, hitches up in the pocket and looks for an open receiver

Now, let's  address the 3 tech rusher, and how we evade his rush and throw from the pocket.  On  the  snap,  QB  drops  and  reads  through  his progression.  As  the  3  tech  rusher  gets "QB high"  (even  to  the  QB),  the  rusher  begins frapping the QB with the pool noodle.  The QB  dips  his  back  shoulder  through  the  reach  of  the  3  tech  rusher,  hitches up in to the pocket,  looking  to  throw  to  an  open  receiver  in  the shaded area.  If no receiver  is  open, QB  tucks  the ball and runs,  and  the  play is dead.  If the QB gets the ball off  before  the  4  second  timer expires, the rusher gives him a pop with his hand shield pad, simulating the live game sensation of being hit as you throw the ball.

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot. Rushers  #1  &  #4  move  the  hose to the new spot.  Rusher #2 is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.  Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows  his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.


The 5 tech 'live' rusher simulates his path to the QB, as if being blocked by the left tackle.

Now, let's  address the 5 tech rusher, and how we evade his rush and throw from the pocket.  On  the  snap,  QB  drops  and  reads  through  his  progression.  As  the  5  tech  rusher gets "QB high"  (even  to  the  QB),  the  rusher  begins frapping the QB with the pool noodle.  The QB  "S-hitches"  up  in  to  the  pocket,  looking  to  throw  to  an  open  receiver in the shaded area.  If no receiver is open, QB tucks the ball and runs, and the play is dead.  If  the QB gets the ball off  before  the  4  second  timer expires, the rusher gives him a pop with his hand shield pad, simulating the live game sensation of being hit as you throw the ball.

If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  #2  &  #4  move  the hose to the new spot.  Rusher #3 is responsible to move and  set  the  QB  tee.   Once  it  is  set,  the  official  timer  blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock.

If it is an incomplete pass;  the line ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the down.


2. ESCAPING THE POCKET AND THROWING ON THE RUN

This  is  where  Mayhem's becomes exciting and which truly separates it from the traditional 7 on  7  format!   Where  the  traditional  7  on 7 ends for the quarterback at the 4-second timer, Mayhem  7's has the option for the quarterback to extend the play, by escape the pocket and  extend  the  play  beyond  the  4-second  timer.  There  are  only  two  rules  that  apply,  if the quarterback escapes the pocket;

1.  The quarterback must make a clear attempt to escape the pocket, prior to the expiration of the 4-second timer.  As he escapes the pocket, the official timer sounds the airhorn.

2. The  quarterback  must  continually  move  toward the direction of sideline that he escaped from (Right or Left), and must make a throw on the run before he steps out of bounds.   There is no stopping to set up, and no reversing field..

This is also the point where everyone on the field, offensively and defensively, gets additional quality work in.  As the airhorn sounds;

• Offensively,  receivers  and  running backs now work on "scramble rules" to get open for the quarterback.  Vertical  routes  come  back  to the QB, underneath routes turn up field and go.  crossing routes reverse field and find open areas to sit in.

• Defensively,  they  must  now  engage  and adjust to the offensive scramble rules.  If in man coverage,  they'll  need  to  stick with their man, communicate amongst themselves if passing off  receivers.  If  playing  zone, they  need  to  find  receivers  who  are  crossing or settling in their coverage area.

Let's begin with the A gap pressure rusher (#2), in the 1 tech alignment. 


Not a high percentage escape from this pressure, but keep it in your tool belt!  QB reverses out the back door the same side the pressure comes from, gets 2-3 yds. depth, then must find an open receiver while running toward the sideline.

Let's  start  off  with  the  escape  method from an A gap rusher.  This is not a high percentage escape  method off this pressure, but keep it in your tool belt.  It will be most successful off an over-exuberant  linebacker  who  sees a clear shot at you, and approaches you like an out-of-control freight train!  

QB ESCAPE / THROW ON THE RUN
On the snap, QB drops and sees the immediate linebacker blitz.  QB allows the blitzer to approach within a yard of him, then reverses out (to the same side of the pressure), gets 3-4 yds. depth, gets his front shoulder turned upfield, and looks for an open receiver while running toward the sideline.  The QB cannot stop and set up to throw once he leaves the pocket.  

EXTENDED PLAY SIGNAL
As soon as the QB breaks the pocket, the official timer sounds an air horn.  The air horn alerts the receivers and the defense that the QB has bailed the pocket.  Receivers go into their scramble rules (Going long; coming back, Short route; Go long, Breaking in; break out).  Defense must adjust to the scramble rules.  If in man coverage, they'll need to stick to their man.  If playing zone, they need find open receivers and cover area.

*Dotted lines indicate the scramble rules from the original route run by receivers

BLITZER & RUSHERS
The A gap blitzer runs down the QB with the pool noodle, and delivers body strikes to him, giving him a sense of pursuit pressure.  The 5 tech rusher (#1 or #4, to the side that the QB escapes) is allowed to attack the QB from the front (simulating a DE) and deliver a hand shield blow as the QB makes his throw.

PLAY RESULT
If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  #1  &  #4  move the hose to the new spot. Rusher #2 or #3 are responsible to move  and  reset  the  QB tee.  Once it is set, the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24  second  clock.  If  no  receiver is open, QB must run out-of-bounds at the sideline, and the play  is  dead.  If  it  is  an  incomplete  pass;  the  line  ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the new down.

Now let's look at the B gap escape on the 3 tech alignment rush.  


The B gap escape comes under and around the 3 tech rusher. QB gets depth out of the pocket, turns his front shoulder downfield and looks for an open receiver

This is how we teach our QB's to escape from the B gap pressure from the 3 tech rusher.

QB ESCAPE / THROW ON THE RUN
On the snap, QB drops.  On the two second count, all rushers take two hard steps upfield.  Only the live rusher (#3/3 tech) continues to the QB.  #3 takes an arc angle to the QB, as if being blocked by the right guard.  As the 3 tech gets even with the QB, the QB ducks under and around the 3 tech, gets 4-5 yds. depth, gets his front shoulder turned upfield and looks for an open receiver, while moving toward the sideline.

EXTENDED PLAY SIGNAL
As soon as the QB breaks the pocket, the official timer sounds an air horn.  The air horn alerts the receivers and the defense that the QB has bailed the pocket.  Receivers go into their scramble rules (Going long; coming back, Short route; Go long, Breaking in; break out).  Defense must adjust to the scramble rules.  If in man coverage, they'll need to stick to their man.  If playing zone, they need find open receivers and cover area.

*Dotted lines indicate the scramble rules from the original route run by receivers

BLITZER & RUSHERS
The B gap rusher runs down the QB with the pool noodle, and delivers body strikes to him, giving him a sense of pursuit pressure.  The 5 tech rusher (#4), to the side that the QB escapes, is allowed to attack the QB from the front (simulating a DE) and deliver a hand shield blow as the QB makes his throw.

PLAY RESULT
If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  #1  &  #4  move the hose to the new spot. Rusher #2 or #3 are responsible to move  and  reset  the  QB tee.  Once it is set, the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24  second  clock.  If  no  receiver is open, QB must run out-of-bounds at the sideline, and the play  is  dead.  If  it  is  an  incomplete  pass;  the  line  ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the new down.

Now let's look at the C gap escape on the 5 tech alignment outside rush.  


The C gap escape comes from the 5 tech rusher. QB makes an "influence" step with his front foot and shoulder to get the 5 tech to bite up in the pocket, the reverses out the back door

This is how we teach our QB's to escape the C gap pressure of the 5 tech outside rusher.

QB ESCAPE / THROW ON THE RUN
On the snap, QB drops.  On the two second count, all rushers take two hard steps upfield.  Only the live rusher (#1/5 tech) continues to the QB.  #3 takes an arc angle to the QB, as if being blocked by the left tackle.  As the 5 tech gets even with the QB, the QB makes an "influence" step with his front foot and shoulder to get the 5 tech to move up in the pocket.  QB then reverses out the back door, gets 4-5 yds. depth, gets his front shoulder turned upfield and looks for an open receiver, while moving toward the sideline.

EXTENDED PLAY SIGNAL
As soon as the QB breaks the pocket, the official timer sounds an air horn.  The air horn alerts the receivers and the defense that the QB has bailed the pocket.  Receivers go into their scramble rules (Going long; coming back, Short route; Go long, Breaking in; break out).  Defense must adjust to the scramble rules.  If in man coverage, they'll need to stick to their man.  If playing zone, they need find open receivers and cover area.

*Dotted lines indicate the scramble rules from the original route run by receivers

BLITZER & RUSHERS
The C gap rusher runs down the QB with the pool noodle, and delivers body strikes to him, giving him a sense of pursuit pressure.  The 1 tech rusher (#2), to the side that the QB escapes, is allowed to attack the QB from the front (simulating a DE) and deliver a hand shield blow as the QB makes his throw.

PLAY RESULT
If  the  result  of  the play ends up in pass completion; the line ref's job is to set the new L.O.S spot.  Rushers  #1  &  #4  move the hose to the new spot. Rusher #2 or #3 are responsible to move  and  reset  the  QB tee.  Once it is set, the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24  second  clock.  If  no  receiver is open, QB must run out-of-bounds at the sideline, and the play  is  dead.  If  it  is  an  incomplete  pass;  the  line  ref sets the ball on the QB tee, and the official timer blows his whistle and starts the 24 second clock and declares the new down.


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